Creative Commons Salon Ottawa: Open Data

www.opendatasalon.ca | Twitter #CCOTTAWA

The Creative Law Society and The Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) present:
Creative Commons Salon Ottawa on the theme of “Open Data”

When: March 30th, 1-5pm (with a reception to follow)
Where: Fauteux Building, University of Ottawa (FTX 147B)

Speakers:
David Eaves (eaves.ca)
Dr. Elizabeth Judge (University of Ottawa)
Edward Ocampo-Gooding (Ottawa Open Data)
Joey Coleman (Journalist)
Nick Edouard (BuzzData)
Sébastien Pierre (MontréalOuvert and QuébecOuvert)
Tracey Lauriault (Carleton Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centredatalibre.ca)

At this event, we’re also especially pleased to be re-launching a Creative Commons Canada affiliate. Athabasca University, BCcampus and CIPPIC have joined forces to form a new CC affiliate team in Canada.

With the Open Data movement exploding, this is an opportune time to find out more about it and discuss it.  Most major cities in Canada now have open data portals where municipal governments openly and freely release public sector data, such as maps, statistics and other government documents. The federal government is making open data the central focus of its Open Government Initiative in order to increase transparency and citizen participation.

This event is also not just for data users!  We will be facilitating a roundtable discussion for data providers to discuss compatibility issues between the licenses of different data portals.  Creative Commons, which already provides the default license for open data portals in Australia and New Zealand, is renewing its focus on data for the next version of their license suite (version 4.0).  This roundtable will provide an opportunity to talk about how governments can make their own data portals compatible with this international standard, and about the possibilities for adopting Creative Commons licenses.

See full schedule here.

RSVP on Facebook.

CLaw and CARFAC present Ottawa ArtLaw Pub Night!

CLaw and CARFAC (Canadian Artists’ Representation) invite you to join us for a multidisciplinary pint!

Step in from the cold and have a drink (or two, or three) with members of Ottawa’s arts and legal community. We will be taking this opportunity to discuss CARFAC’s upcoming Arts Law Conference in June 2012, including ways for students to get involved. Come and mingle with people who share similar interests!

Where: The Royal Oak (161 Laurier Avenue East)
When: Wednesday, February 29th, 6:00 to 9:00 pm
RSVP on Facebook.

The New Deal: HitRECord – Remixing Within Legal Limits

Joseph Gordon-Levitt, best known for his acting gigs, has been working on a side project since early 2010 – HitRECord. He describes HitRECord as an “open collaborative production company” that works with movies, music, art, and writing. By creating a free account on the site, anyone can upload any creative content (a.k.a. “RECord”), making it available for other users to mix, sample, or add on. This project is different from sites like YouTube, which allow users to share and view content. Rather, HitRECord aims to encourage online collaboration – it is less of an exhibition space and more of a studio for artists to work together.

The concept behind this project is to address the exclusivity of Hollywood and mainstream cultural industries by creating a space where anyone can take an active role in the creation and production of content. The success of the project is demonstrated by the content it has already produced. Last year, HitRECord released an anthology of works including music, a DVD of videos, and a book of writing and visual art. HitRECord content has been showcased at SXSW, Sundance, and the Orpheum Theatre in LA. A 3-book deal was also recently signed with an imprint of Harper Collins.

The question is: how can this project, one that is premised on remixing and using other people’s content, work within the confines of copyright and intellectual property laws? To keep the project legal, it created a unique set of rules, “The HitRECord Accord“ – essentially a comprehensive terms of use. On the project’s FAQ page, it acknowledges that in order for the project to work a lot of trust must be placed on the user. For example, one clause in the Accord states that any content a user uploads must be owned entirely by the user, and must not contain anyone else’s work that the user does not have the rights to distribute.

HitRECord is a project that found a way to work within legal limits while making cultural and artistic production more accessible to the public. More importantly, it brings a social aspect to art-making by fostering a sense of community and collaboration between users online. Check out the HitRECord website for more information about how it works, browse through some of the recent collaborations, and get involved!

“Yours, Mine, Ours” Copyright Discussion Panel Now Available Online

On November 28, 2011, CLaw and CIPPIC jointly organized a panel discussion on the current state of fair-dealing and copyright law in Canada.

Speakers included Gerry Burtenshaw (Legitmix), Jacques Ménard (DOC), Aidan O’Neill (Fasken Martineau), and Martha Rans (ALO), with David Fewer of CIPPIC as moderator. Attendees from the law school and the arts & cultural community at large were treated to a fascinating range of perspectives. Issues around the copyright “pie” such as practical impediments to the practice of visual artists and filmmakers, Bill C-11′s proposed “YouTube Provision”, and the law’s potential hindrance to technological innovation were discussed at length.

Listen in on the recording, available in its entirety here (or at the link below), and add your own views or comments to particular points of personal interest!

CLaw & CIPPIC “Yours, Mine, Ours” Copyright Discussion Panel | Audio Recording by UOttawaClaw